Basics

Using Turbo Studio enables you to configure the filesystem and registry of a container, embed external runtimes and components, take application snapshots, and create Turbo Virtual Machine (SVM) or executable files. The primary interface consists of a ribbon bar along the top and several panes accessed by buttons on the left.

Title Bar

Studio title bar

  • The Start Menu button, or the circle at the top left of the window, enables container configurations to be created, opened, saved, imported, applied, and closed.
  • The Options bar provides Turbo Studio customization options, the ability to set proxy settings, and install certificates.
  • The Help bar provides access to Turbo Studio documentation.

Ribbon Bar

Studio ribbon bar

  • The Virtual Application tab provides access to the snapshot, build features, and output configuration options such as the startup file, output directory, and diagnostic-mode selection.
  • The Runtimes tab provides a selection of auto-configurable runtime engines which can be embedded into your application. These include .NET Framework, Java, Flash, Shockwave, Acrobat Reader, and SQL Server 2005 Express.
  • The Advanced tab provides functions such as viewing embedded layers and platform merge.

Snapshot

  • Capture Before button is to capture the machine state before you install your application for a snapshot.
  • Capture and Diff button is to capture the machine state after you install your application for a snapshot.

For more information on the snapshot process, see Snapshot documentation.

Build

  • Build button is to build your container image output.
  • Build and Run button is to build your container image output and then execute it for testing purposes.
  • Run and Merge button builds your container image and then executes it within the Turbo Client Runtime environment. Any changes made while inside the container environment will be added back to the configuration after the application is shutdown. This can be used to quickly set defaults in your container image.

Output

  • Startup File field is to set the path to the application which runs when starting your container. The Multiple button shows the Startup File manager dialog where additional settings can be specified.

  • Output File field is the name of the file that is created when your container image configuration is built.

  • Project Type dropdown allows you to set the type of output to generate. The following values are possible:

    • Layer (.svm) is a bare Turbo container image file that can be pushed to Turbo.net Hub, used in Turbo Server, imported into the Turbo.net Client Runtime environment, or used as a dependency in another project.
    • Standalone/ISV Application (.exe) is a standalone executable file with no dependence on the Turbo.net Client Runtime or Turbo.net Hub. This output type requires an Enterprise or ISV license for Turbo Studio.
    • Portable Application (.exe) is a packaged executable file which contains the Turbo.net Client Runtime components and integrates with the Turbo.net Hub or an on-premise Turbo Server.

    At runtime, you may see different behavior between Standalone and Portable applications. This is because they use a different set of default runtime settings which can change how the application behaves.

    • The default isolation settings will be different. This will change how the application can interact with the software on the native machine. Standalone executables will have the isolation settings exactly as you see it in the xappl and in Turbo Studio. Since Portal applications are built to run on the Turbo.net Client Runtime, its isolation settings will be a combination of the image configuration and the isolation mode which can be dynamically assigned at runtime. The default mode is full isolation which will override merge or writecopy isolation settings in the image configuration. You can change the isolation mode for a Portable application with the --isolate parameter. Setting the isolation mode to merge will defer isolation settings to those assigned in the image configuration. There is no way to change the base isolation mode in Standalone applications.
    • The default VM settings flags are also different between the two application types. Standalone executables will only have those that are defined in the image configuration. Portable application will additionally contain these settings: ExeOptimization, SpawnComServers, IsolateWindowClasses, SuppressPopups, ForceWriteCopyIsolation, MergePathEnvVars, MergeVmSettings, DumpStdStreams, InheritFolderMaps, and ForceEnvironmentVariablesWriteCopyIsolation. See xappl reference for more information on these flags.
  • Options button shows the Output Options dialog. This is used to enable diagnostics for .exe outputs or configure Portable Executable settings.

Tools

  • Configuration Wizard button shows the startup wizard where there are quick links to common process wizards; building from template, snapshot, install into a container, or manual configuration.
  • Snapshot Merge button allows a container sandbox changes to be imported into the configuration.
  • Import Configuration button allows a container image to be imported from an external source, such as: a ThinApp configuration, MSI package, Zenworks package, the Turbo.net Hub, or from the local Turbo.net Client Runtime image repository.

Publish

  • Publish to Server button allows an output container image to be pushed directly to the Turbo.net Hub or a Turbo Server instance.
  • Publish to Local Repository button allows an output container image to be pushed to the local Turbo.net Client Runtime repository.

Left-side Button Panes

Studio side bar

  • The Filesystem pane displays the application virtual filesystem and enables you to add and remove virtual files and directories.
  • The Registry pane displays the application virtual registry and enables you to add and remove virtual registry keys and data values.
  • The Settings pane enables you to configure container metadata, startup image, startup/shutdown shims, and process configuration options.
  • The Layers pane enables you to add external container components.
  • The Install pane enables you to configure the MSI setup package, shortcuts, and other shell integration options.
  • The Expiration pane enables you to configure application expiration options.
  • The Network pane enables you to configure container proxy and DNS settings.

Note: Turbo Studio users are responsible for any third-party licensing compliance for redistributable components included using virtualization.

Virtual Filesystem

Studio virtual file system

Turbo Studio enables you to embed a virtual filesystem into your executable. Embedded files are accessible by your Turbo-processed application as if they were present in the actual filesystem. Virtual files are isolated from the host device. Virtual files do not require security privileges on the host device regardless of whether the virtual files reside in a privileged directory. Because virtual files are embedded in the application executable, shared DLLs do not interfere with those installed by other applications on the host device.

In the event of a conflict between a file in the virtual filesystem and a file present on the host device, the file in the virtual filesystem takes precedence.

Note: When running a container on Windows 7, the All Users Directory\Application Data and All Users Directory root folders will map to the same folder at runtime. To prevent one setting from overriding another, verify that the isolation settings for these folders are the same.

Isolation Modes

Studio isolation modes

Folders may be containerized in Full, Merge, Write Copy, or Hide mode.

  • Full: Full mode is used when the directory is required to be completely isolated from the host device. Only files in the virtual filesystem are visible to the application even if a corresponding directory exists on the host device. Any writes to files are redirected to the sandbox data area.
  • Merge: Merge mode is used when the directory is required to have some level of interaction with the host device. Files will be visible from both the virtual filesystem and the host device. Any writes to files which are new or already exist on the host device will pass through and be written to the host device. Any writes to files that are in the virtual filesystem will be written to the sandbox data area.
  • Write Copy: Write Copy mode is used when the directory is required to have visibility to files on the host device but cannot change them. Files will be visible from both the virtual filesystem and the host device. Any writes to files are redirected to the sandbox data area.
  • Hide: Hide mode is used when a directory on the host device could interfere with the application's ability to run properly. The application will receive a File Not Found error code whenever an attempt is made to read from or write to files in the directory even if the files exist on the host device.

Tip: To apply selected isolation modes to all subfolders, right-click on the folder, choose Isolation, select the checkbox for Apply to Subfolders, then select OK.

File Attributes

Studio file attributes

  • Hidden: Files and folders can be hidden from shell browse dialogs and other applications. This is used to prevent internal components and data files from being displayed to the user. To hide a file or folder, select the checkbox in the Hidden column adjacent to the desired file or folder. Note: The Hidden Flag is NOT the same as the Hide isolation mode. Enabling the Hidden Flag prevents a file or folder from displaying in browse dialogs or from directory enumeration APIs; it does not prevent the application (and potentially the end-user) from accessing the folder or file contents by direct binding. To prevent the file or folder from being found by the application, enable Hide isolation mode.
  • Read Only: Flagging files and folders as read-only prevents the application from modifying the file or folder contents. To make a file or folder read-only, select the checkbox in the Read Only column next to the desired file or folder.
  • No Upgrade: By default, files in the virtual filesystem can be upgraded with patches (refer to "Updating Registration Settings" in the Register containers in the Windows Shell section for more information). If there are files in the virtual filesystem that should not be upgraded, such as user data files, select the checkbox in the No Upgrade column next to the desired file or folder.
  • No Sync: This feature only applies to containers that are delivered and managed by Turbo Virtual Desktop Server. By default, files in the virtual filesystem can be synchronized to a user's Turbo account. This enables the application state to be maintained across different devices that are Turbo enabled. If there are folders in the virtual filesystem that should not be synchronized and remain only on the local device, select the checkbox in the No Sync column next to the desired file or folder. This setting is managed on a folder level and applies to all files within that folder.

Filesystem Compression

Studio filesystem compression

To reduce executable size, Turbo Studio can compress virtual filesystem contents. This reduces container size by approximately 50% but also prevents profiling and streaming of the application. By default, the Compress Payload option in the Process Configuration area of the Settings panel is unchecked. Leave this box unchecked during the build process if the application will be optimized for streaming from Turbo Virtual Desktop Server.

Note: Disabling payload compression may significantly increase the size of the container binary.

Virtual Registry

Studio virtual registry

Turbo Studio enables you to embed a virtual registry into your executable. Embedded registry keys are accessible by your Turbo-processed application as if they were present in the actual registry. Virtual registry keys are isolated from the host device. Virtual registry keys do not require security privileges on the host device regardless of whether the virtual files reside in a privileged directory. Because virtual registry entries are embedded in the application executable, other applications are unable to disrupt application execution by inadvertent modification of registry entries.

The Classes root, Current User root, Local Machine root, and Users root folders correspond to the HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT, HKEY_CURRENT_USER, HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, and HKEY_USERS keys on the host machine.

Registry string values can include well-known variables such as @WINDIR@, @SYSWOW64@, @PROGRAMFILESX86@ and @PROGRAMFILES@.

In the event of a conflict between a key or value in the virtual registry and data present on the host device registry, information in the virtual registry takes precedence.

Isolation Modes

Keys may be containerized in Full, Merge, Write Copy, or Hide mode.

  • Full: Full mode is used when the key is required to be completely isolated from the host device. Only values in the virtual registry are visible to the application even if a corresponding key exists on the host device. Any writes to values are redirected to the sandbox data area.

  • Merge: Merge mode is used when the key is required to have some level of interaction with the host device. Values will be visible from both the virtual registry and the host device. Any writes to values which are new or already exist on the host device will pass through and be written to the host device. Any writes to values that are in the virtual registry will be written to the sandbox data area.

  • Write Copy: Write Copy mode is used when the key is required to have visibility to values on the host device but cannot change them. Values will be visible from both the virtual registry and the host device. Any writes to values are redirected to the sandbox data area.

  • Hide: Hide mode is used when a key on the host device could interfere with the application's ability to run properly. The application will receive a Key Not Found error code whenever an attempt is made to read from or write to values in the key even if the values exist on the host device.

    Tip: To apply selected isolation modes to all subkeys, right-click on the key, choose Isolation, select the checkbox for Apply to Subkeys, then OK.

Key Attributes

Studio key attributes

  • No Sync: This feature only applies to containers that are delivered and managed by Turbo Virtual Desktop Server. By default, keys and values in the virtual registry can be synchronized to a user's Turbo account. This enables the application state to be maintained across different devices that are Turbo enabled. If there are keys in the virtual registry that should not be synchronized and remain only on the local device, select the checkbox in the No Sync column next to the desired key. This setting is managed on a key level and applies to all values within that folder.

Importing Registry Hive Files

Studio import registry hive files

Turbo Studio can import registry hive (.reg) files into the virtual registry. To import a .reg file, select the Import button in the Registry panel, then choose the registry hive file to import.

Runtimes and Components

Many components and runtime systems consist of large, complex sets of filesystem entries and registry settings. Turbo Studio contains a collection of pre-configured component settings which can be added to your container with a single click. For example, if your application is a .NET Framework 4.0 application, then selecting the .NET Framework 4.0 component will allow your executable to run on machines without the .NET Framework installed.

Additional runtimes and components are added to the container during the snapshot process, before the after snapshot is taken.

To add a runtime or component:

  1. Select the Runtimes tab on the ribbon bar.
  2. Select the appropriate runtime or component. Selected components are indicated with a highlighted button. To remove a component, click on the button again. The button will no longer be highlighted and the component will not be included.

Note: The displayed runtimes apply to the currently selected target architecture (see process settings). If the target architecture is changed, architecture specific runtimes, like .NET 2 or .NET 3.x will still be included but will not display as selected. To deselect them, the target architecture must be changed back, and the runtimes can be deselected.

Note: Depending on the size of the component, the executable size can significantly increase. Only select components that are required for proper execution of your application.

Note: You are responsible for compliance with licensing for any third-party redistributable components included in your containerized application.

Using .NET Runtimes

To limit conflicts with installed .NET runtimes, the .NET runtime packages are isolated from the native file system. If the application requires access to multiple .NET versions, it is necessary to include all of the required runtimes in the virtual package. For example, including only the .NET 4 runtime will hide visibility to the .NET 3.5 runtime on the native file system. This is fine if the application only requires the .NET 4 components, but would be problematic if it also requires earlier versions of .NET.

An alternative approach would be to use the snapshot feature of Turbo Studio to build a custom .NET component for the application. This approach provides visibility into the files and registry keys that are available and allows for custom isolation settings.

Configuring the Java Runtime

Turbo Studio provides specialized support for the Java runtime. If your application is based on Java runtime, select the Sun Java Runtime button on the Runtimes ribbon bar. This displays the Java configuration menu.

Select the appropriate version of the Java runtime from the Java runtime version drop-down menu. If you deploy your application as a set of .class files, select Class from the Startup Type drop-down menu; if you deploy within a .jar file, select Jar. Enter the startup class name or Jar name in the appropriate textbox, along with any additional Java runtime options.

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